Photography: Macro images of insects taken on a mobile phone

A bug’s life! Amazing macro pictures of tiny insects in Indonesia captured on a MOBILE PHONE camera

  • Series of incredible macro photographs were captured by photographer Andi Sriyadi in West Java, Indonesia 
  •  They feature a lizard crawling up a branch, a praying mantis and a damselfly poking its head through a leaf 
  • Andi used a Samsung Galaxy A5 and a modified lens from a £5 camera bought from an online marketplace 

An Indonesian photographer has captured a series of amazing macro pictures of tiny insects using a mobile phone camera.  

Andi Sriyadi took these spectacular macro images with just a Samsung Galaxy A5 and modified lens from a £5 camera bought from an online marketplace.

A scaly Bunglon – a member of the lizard family – was captured crawling up a branch, before opening wide and greeting Andi with a grin.

A scaly Bunglon – a member of the lizard family – was captured crawling up a branch, before opening wide and greeting the photographer with a grin

Pictured: A praying mantis. The mantis gets its unique name for its distinguished front legs which are angled as though held together in a praying position. The insect is a formidable hunter which can swivel its head 180 degrees to survey its surroundings for its prey and other predators. Their most common prey are moths, flies and other insects but they are known to eat small mammals or reptiles, as well as engaging in cannibalism. The most famous example of mantis cannibalism is when the female eats her mate after, or sometimes during, mating

Pictured: A grasshopper in West Java, Indonesia. Grasshoppers, unlike most other insects, have their auditory organs on their belly, not their head. The simple eardrum on their abdomen allows them to hear the songs of female grasshoppers so they can find them to mate. To produce their own unique sound, the insect rubs its hind legs against its forewings 

Pictured: A jumping spider in West Java, Indonesia. Rather than having evolutionarily adapted hind legs to leap, jumping spiders suddenly change the blood flow in their body to contract special muscles, which allows them to pounce on their prey, sometimes soaring 50 times their own body length 

And the keen photographer, 31, skilfully photographed a Praying Mantis and Jumping spider.

He also shot a luminous green grasshopper – who appeared nosey – clutching on to the edge to get a closer look.

Meanwhile a Damselfly pokes his head out of a half-eaten leaf.

Pictured: An any lifts a fly in West Java, Indonesia. Andi Sriyadi took these spectacular macro images with just a Samsung Galaxy A5 and modified lens from a £5 camera bought from an online marketplace

Pictured: A small snake stares down the lens of the camera in West Java, Indonesia. Andi said: ‘I have fallen in love with photography ever since I was in senior high school

Pictured: This blue-banded bee refuses to move and throws a hard stare at the camera. Unlike most other species of bees, the blue-banded insect is a solitary bee, meaning that the adult fee will mate and construct a clay soil nest by herself. Their unique name comes from the metallic blue stripes that twist around the insect’s abdomen 

Pictured: A Damselfly pokes his head out of a half-eaten leaf. Nature-lover Andi is adamant that this close-up work is more rewarding – as it brings people closer to learning the finer details about mammals

The freelance writer got close to the crawly critters in West Java, Indonesia.

Andi said: ‘I have fallen in love with photography ever since I was in senior high school.

‘But due to the limited tools, including equipment, I chose macro photography in 2017.’

Pictured: Two scaly scaly Bunglons clamber up either side of a plant in West Java, Indonesia

Pictured: A dragonfly latches on to its prey in West Java, Indonesia. Dragonflies are some of the oldest insects in the world, with fossils of the winged creatures found dating back some 300 million years 

Pictured: A grasshopper holds on to a branch in West Java, Indonesia. Andi shot the  luminous green grasshopper – who appeared nosey – clutching on to the edge of the branch to get a closer look

Pictured: An ant sits on a twig in West Java, Indonesia. The amateur photographer has committed three years to this artwork and gathered a 50,000-strong Instagram following

The nature-lover is adamant that this close-up work is more rewarding – as it brings people closer to learning the finer details about mammals.

‘Insect macro photography is simple and unique’, he admitted.

‘You can get unexpected details from the picture that you have taken.’

The amateur photographer has committed three years to this artwork and gathered a whopping 50,000-strong Instagram following.

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