Dangerous QAnon conspiracy theory spread by host of celebs including Roseanne Barr and James Woods

THE dangerous, unfounded QAnon conspiracy theory has been spread by numerous celebrities including Roseanne Barr and James Woods.

And last night, US President Donald Trump refused to condemn the QAnon conspiracy theorists.


QAnon is a dangerous right-wing conspiracy theory that the FBI believes is a domestic terror threat.

It is centered on unfounded allegations the president is waging a secret battle against a pedophile ring filled with celebrities and political elites, who have been covertly running the US government for decades.

Last night, Town Hall moderator Savannah Guthrie asked Trump to "disavow" their belief "that Democrats have a satanic pedophile ring and you [Trump] are the savior of that."

She challenged him: "Just say it's crazy and untrue."

The President replied: "I don't know about QAnon.

"What I do hear about it, they are very strongly against pedophilia, they fight it very hard. But I know nothing about it."

Even though celebrities are often the targets of the allegations, some have come out in support of the baseless theory.

Roseanne Barr


The disgraced comedian has written a number of since-deleted tweets in support of QAnon.

In 2018, the former TV star tweeted praise for Trump, writing that the president had "broken up pedophile rings in high places everywhere".

Barr tweeted: "President Trump has freed so many children held in bondage to pimps all over the world. Hundreds each month.

"He has broken up trafficking rings in high places everywhere. notice that.

"I disagree on some things but give him benefit of doubt 4-now."

The sitcom star later clarified she was praising Trump for naming April "Child Abuse Prevention Month", Buzzfeed previously reported.

Barr's previous tweets also include her asking "who is Q?" and asking for QAnon to text her.

According to the baseless theory, Q, is an anonymous source who is trying to tell the world a secret – or multiple secrets.

James Woods



James Woods has also been said to spread QAnon theories.

In April 2018, the actor tweeted: "I’m holding back my thoughts on #Q. Let’s see where the wind blows."

On October 6, James tweeted an old video of Former First Lady Michelle Obama praising Harvey Weinstein.

The video was from 2013, before the #MeToo movement and before Weinstein's actions were widely known.

It follows the common trope of QAnon supporters of identifying Democrats as "sharing a bed" with sex abusers.

Pete Evans



Celebrity chef Pete Evans shared a video from a press conference about the US President spoke about QAnon supporters on his Instagram with popcorn emojis.

In May, the Australian also put up an Instagram story that mirrors language used by believers of the conspiracy theory, Buzzfeed reported.

The post included a chart with dozens of references to parts of the theory including a prominent "Q".

Curt Schilling



The ex-professional baseball player has written a handful of tweets about QAnon.

In June 2018, the former Boston Red Sox pitchertweeted a now-deleted YouTube video saying he has been "researching the movement".

He wrote: "I've been asked about the "Q" for a few months now.

"Not really knowing who or what it was in any sort of detail.

"Started researching this movement a few weeks ago and someone sent this to me today. Pretty much impossible to stop watching once you start."

A month later, he tweeted at Media Matters criticising them for calling the QAnon theory "baseless".

A month later, he also tweeted: "@MediaMattersZA I think it's fantastic that your only attack is "baseless" without ever actually pointing to a 'lie'.

"It has to suck to know the Q has reported more accurate news in the past 14 days than your rag in its entire existence!"

What is QAnon?

QAnon is a dangerous right-wing conspiracy theory that the FBI believes is a domestic terror threat.

Its supporters claim the President is communicating about "covert battles" between himself and the Deep State.

According to NBC, the theory centres around an anonymous source, Q, who is trying to tell the world a secret – or multiple secrets.

These centre around unfounded allegations that President Trump and special counsel Robert Mueller are waging a secret battle against an alleged pedophile ring.

Supporters of the entirely unfounded theory believe that this ring is filled with celebrities and political elites, who have been covertly running the United States government for decades.

Alex Jones



Before the Infowars conspiracy theorist was de-platformed, he tweeted and made video about QAnon.

In a tweet from 2018, Alex wrote: "Despite worrying signs that America is heading to the point of no return, QAnon indicates that Trump may be gearing up to fight back against the globalist coup."

Alex also shared from this Infowars channel called "QAnon decoded".

A search of "QAnon" on his website also brings up a video titled "Q joins Infowars: Live on Air".

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