Apocalyptic scenes in Chernobyl as drone footage reveals devastation

Apocalyptic scenes in Chernobyl as drone footage reveals devastation caused within the exclusion zone by forest fires

  • Firefighters fought back the flames for almost two weeks and stopped it reaching the nuclear reactor site 
  • While potential disaster was averted, the devastation wreaked by the fire has been laid bare by aerial footage
  • A large part of the woodland has been razed into a scorched wasteland, while some areas are still smoldering
  • 1,000-square mile exclusion zone was established to prevent exposure to lethal gamma after 1986 disaster

Haunting drone footage has revealed the path of destruction blazed by the forest fires in Chernobyl’s exclusion zone. 

Firefighters fought back the flames for almost two weeks, hyper-aware that the inferno was creeping towards the site of the exploded nuclear plant.

Spikes in radiation levels have been measured in the exclusion zone, but the fire was wrestled under control before it reached the site of the gamma-flooded reactor.

Yet while potential disaster was averted, the devastation wreaked by the fire has been laid bare by aerial footage.

A large part of the woodland has been razed into a scorched wasteland, while some areas are still smoldering. 

The 1,000-square mile exclusion zone, which was established to prevent exposure to lethal gamma, is largely deserted except for about 200 people who have defied orders to leave. 

Charred buildings which have weathered the blaze can be seen surrounded by blackened trees, which would usually be in green spring bloom in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

Haunting drone footage has revealed the path of destruction blazed by the forest fires in Chernobyl’s exclusion zone 

The charred buildings which have weathered the blaze can be seen surrounded by blackened trees, which would usually be in green spring bloom.      

The footage was taken by local resident Stanislav Kapralov, who said that over the last 30 years the local flora and fauna had successfully revived after the 1986 disaster, but has in the space of a fortnight been decimated once again.

Ukrainian police said residents had started the fire by burning rubbish around their houses and then taking the smoldering residue to a landfill the sight.

The residue then reportedly caused dry to catch on fire and the wildfire spread quickly, becoming a full-blown emergency on April 4.

The fire-starters – who have been fined – tried to put the fire out themselves before calling the fire service, making the firefighters’ job more difficult along with strong winds. 

The smoke from the fires was blown to the Ukrainian capital of Kiev some 60 miles away and the authorities warned residents not to leave their homes unless strictly necessary because of the risks the smoke posed for their health.

A large part of the woodland has been razed into a scorched wasteland, while some areas are still smoldering

The footage was taken by local resident Stanislav Kapralov, who said that over the last 30 years the local flora and fauna had successfully revived after the 1986 disaster, but has in the space of a fortnight been decimated once again

Spikes in radiation levels have been measured in the exclusion zone, but the fire was wrestled under control before it reached the site of the gamma-flooded reactor. Yet while potential disaster was averted, the devastation wreaked by the fire has been laid bare by aerial footage (pictured)

Only a few small fires remained and they were under control as they work to stop the fire reaching Belarus. 

The Chernobyl disaster occurred on April 26, 1986, at unit number four in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. 

Initially covered up by the USSR, the explosion sent radioactive fallout across Europe exposing millions to dangerous levels of gamma.

The three other reactors at Chernobyl continued to generate electricity until the power station finally closed in 2000.

A giant protective dome was put in place over the fourth reactor in 2016. Fires occur regularly in the forests near the Chernobyl power plant.

Since the hit HBO series Chernobyl, tourists have flocked to the site of the reactor to glimpse the fallout from the explosion.

Even the control room, which has 40,000 times the average amount of radiation, is open to visitors, who don protective suits as they tour the compound.             

An aerial view shows a forest fire in the exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (picture taken on April 12)

Source: Read Full Article