Princess Anne marks opening of NHS Louisa Jordan Hospital in Glasgow

Princess Anne thanks frontline workers for ‘their successful team effort and astonishing achievement’ as she marks the opening of the NHS Louisa Jordan Hospital in Glasgow via video link

  • Princess Anne has marked opening of NHS Louisa Jordan Hospital in Glasgow
  • Royal family shared a clip of the Princess Royal, 69, sending her congratulations
  • She appeared to be in a room in her house on her Gatcombe Park Estate

Princess Anne has thanked workers for ‘their successful team effort and astonishing achievement’, as she marks the completion of the seventh NHS Nightingale field hospital.

The Princess Royal, 69, featured in a clip on the Royal Family’s Twitter account to congratulate those involved in the building and preparation of the NHS Louisa Jordan Hospital in Glasgow. 

She appeared to speak from her manor house in Gatcombe Park estate in Gloucestershire, where she is isolating. The land is also home to her daughter Zara Tindall, 38, and Peter Phillips, 42, and their families.

Princess Anne (pictured) has thanked workers for ‘their successful team effort and astonishing achievement’ as she marked the completion of the seventh NHS Nightingale field hospital

The Princess Royal, 69, appeared in a clip on the Royal Family’s Twitter account (pictured) to congratulate those involved in the building and preparation of the NHS Louisa Jordan Hospital in Glasgow

NHS Louisa Jordan (pictured) was built in only 20 days and has over 1,000 beds to help against the coronavirus pandemic

For the video, Anne sported a sensible brown, checked blazer for the occasion, while adding simple golden earrings.

The royal said she was ‘particularly pleased’ that the hospital was named after a Glasgow-born nurse, who volunteered and died working for the Scottish Women’s Hospitals (SWH) during the First World War.

Sister Louisa Jordan died on active service in Serbia in 1915, while providing much-needed care to an area of dire need as part of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals for Foreign Services.  

NHS Louisa Jordan was built in only 20 days and has over 1,000 beds to help against the coronavirus pandemic.

Speaking in the clip, Anne said: ‘May I offer my congratulations to everyone who has made it possible to open the NHS Louisa Jordan Hospital in Glasgow.

The royal said she was ‘particularly pleased’ that the hospital was named after a Glasgow-born nurse who volunteered and died working for the Scottish Women’s Hospitals (SWH) during the First World War. Pictured: The Royal Family’s tweet explaining the name

Sister Louisa Jordan (pictured) died on active service in Serbia in 1915 while providing much-needed care to an area of dire need as part of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals for Foreign Services

‘Construction work only began on the 31st March and was completed on the 19th April. An astonishing achievement by contractors and all the NHS staff who were involved in the project.

‘This was a successful team effort and it will need to continue in order to make the best use of the facilities here.’

The royal continued: ‘I am particularly pleased by the name you’ve chosen. A few years ago, I helped celebrate the centenary of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals and their founder Dr Elsie Inglis. 

‘Glasgow born Louisa Jordan and many others responded to her challenge by working as nurses in one of the fourteen hospitals set up across Europe in the First World War.

In 2017, the Princess Royal (pictured above) marked the centenary of the death of Dr Elsie Inglis, the founder of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals. Elsie was one of the first women to graduate from The University of Edinburgh, of which Anne is Chancellor

‘The biggest risk to their patients and themselves was often disease, especially Typhus. Louisa Jordan herself died of Typhus in Serbia in 1915.’

She added: ‘That devotion to patients is being shown by nurses, medical and support staff across Scotland today. So it is entirely fitting that we should name this new hospital after Louisa Jordan.

‘The role of this building is about providing spare capacity which will ensure support to the whole of the NHS in Scotland. And importantly will give confidence that there are enough facilities available for whatever happens now or in the future.

‘COVID-19 has done something very rare. It has affected every single person’s life in some way. Sadly for some, in a very personal and final way. 

NHS Louisa Jordan pictured earlier this month as work continued to prepare the hospital at the SEC event centre in Glasgow

Nicola Sturgeon (pictured) said her Government expects that the NHS Louisa Jordan hospital, set up at the Scottish Events Campus, will not need to be used

‘But while many people feel frustrated and helpless, the Louisa Jordan hospital is a way of being positive and helpful. And although we would all hope that it doesn’t need to be used. We can all be very grateful that it exists.’

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon, said her Government expects that the NHS Louisa Jordan hospital, set up at the Scottish Events Campus, will not need to be used.

In an official statement, Ms Sturgeon said: ‘Everyone involved in establishing the NHS Louisa Jordan deserves our sincere thanks. They are working tirelessly under extremely challenging circumstances to build a unique national facility.’

She continued: ‘While I still hope that it will not be needed, the NHS Louisa Jordan will help our NHS to prepare and provide people with reassurance that we have measures in place to help treat people during this pandemic.’

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